MENU
THE ARTS SOCIETY
BASINGSTOKE
Click here for previous lectures

DateLecture
26 February 2020STUDY DAY Bankrolling the Borgias - A History of the Medici Family
18 March 2020'From Downton to Gatsby. Jewellery and Fashion 1890 - 1929'
15 April 2020Raphael: Genius of the Renaissance in Rome (cf. 500th Anniversary of his death)
20 May 2020James Gillray: "A Caterpillar on the Green Leaf of Reputation". British Caricaturist and Printmaker
17 June 2020Sir Edwin Lutyens (1869 -1944) 150th Anniversary of his birth
08 July 2020AGM followed by: Field of Cloth of Gold: 6,000 Englishmen in France for 18 days - how did they do it? (500th Anniversary of the Event)
18 November 2020THE BORGIAS: The Most Infamous Family in History

Click on a row and scroll to display more details about the lecture

STUDY DAY Bankrolling the Borgias - A History of the Medici Family Douglas Skeggs Wednesday 26 February 2020

The Medici were in many ways an unattractive family. Ruthless in pursuit of profit for their Florentine bank, which had branches in every city of the known world, they were greedy for success, merciless to those who opposed their ambition and vicious in their own internal squabbles. And yet without them, we wouldn’t have Botticelli’s “Birth of Venus”, the Fra Angelico frescoes in San Marco, Donatello’s “David” or the majestic Michelangelo sculptures in the Medici chapel. The Platonic Academy wouldn’t have been founded and the doors for the Baptistry would never have been cast.

This Study Day, composed of three talks, looks into the turbulent history of this extraordinary family.

 1: Bankrolling the Renaissance

Under the guidance of Cosimo Medici, the family became the unofficial rulers of Florence and leading patrons of the arts. This inevitably aroused fierce jealousies, which boiled over in the attempted assassination of Cosimo’s grandson Lorenzo.

2: Popes and Patrons

 With Florence gripped by the apocalyptic preaching of Savonarola, the Medici were exiled from Florence. But they re-emerged triumphantly as Popes in Rome. Here their decadent and eccentric rule led to the Sack of Rome and ultimately opened the door to Luther’s Reformation of the Church.

3: From Riches to Royalty

Although the Medici were a spent force in Italy, an ingenious marriage had put Catherine de Medici on the throne of France, to be followed, shortly afterwards, by Marie de Medici. This last talk looks at the impact these two formidable queens had on the shape of French history.